The Mary Tyler Moore Show

1970 TV-PG 5 seasons

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The Mary Tyler Moore Show

1970 TV-PG 5 seasons
  • Overview
  • Seasons
  • Details
  • Cast
Laughs abound in this Emmy-winning TV classic, with Mary Tyler Moore heading an outstanding cast as spunky Mary Richards, the associate producer of the nightly news at ratings-challenged WJM in Minneapolis. Despite a lack of viewers, the broadcast crew soldiers on as producer Lou Grant (Edward Asner) calls the shots, Murray Slaughter (Gavin MacLeod) writes the copy and clueless Ted Baxter (Ted Knight) mans the anchor desk.
SEASON  1
  • SEASON  1
  • SEASON  3
  • SEASON  4
  • SEASON  5
  • SEASON  7

Summary of Season 1 (1970) - 3 discs

Mary (Mary Tyler Moore), Rhoda (Valerie Harper), Mr. Grant (Ed Asner), Murray (Gavin MacLeod) and everyone's favorite "worst TV anchorman," Ted Baxter (Ted Knight), make their legendary television debut in these sidesplitting episodes from the long-running show's first season. The crew from WJM -- Minneapolis's lowest-rated evening news show -- was the critics' darling, winning a powerful 29 Emmy awards and providing millions of laughs.
Format
DVD
Screen
Full Screen 1.33:1
Subtitles
Spanish (Neutral)
CC
Yes
Audio
English: Dolby Digital Mono, French: Dolby Digital Mono, Spanish (Neutral): Dolby Digital Mono
Rating
TV-PG - This program contains material that parents may find unsuitable for younger children.
age 11+
Common Sense rating OK for kids 11+
  • Mary Tyler Moore
  • Gavin MacLeod
  • Ed Asner
  • Ted Knight
  • Valerie Harper
  • Georgia Engel
  • Betty White
  • Cloris Leachman
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Reviews

age 11+

Common Sense Note

Parents need to know that The Mary Tyler Moore Show is a '70s sitcom that reflects the gender relations of a time that saw the birth of the "career woman." Sexual remarks, crudity, and drinking are present in the workplace in a manner that wouldn't be acceptable today. On the other hand, contrary to today's primetime standards, there's very little strong language, minimal physical contact, and nothing beyond double entendres of a general sexual nature. All of the supporting characters are well-meaning, but have their shortcomings (one drinks a lot, another's promiscuity is the subject of multiple wisecracks), but Mary shines as TV's first single, career-oriented leading lady and reminds viewers of some of the challenges met by her real-world counterparts. Tweens likely won't see the humor in this show, but teens who can put the content in its rightful place in history might enjoy it.

Sexual Content

Innuendo and double entendres are as racy as the content gets. Several characters' sexual escapades are implied, but nothing beyond kissing is shown onscreen. Men comment on women's figures in terms that would be unacceptable in the modern workplace, as when Mary's boss tells her that she has "a great caboose."

Violence

Not applicable

Language

Occasionally "hell."

Social Behavior

The show represents a turning point in how the media presents female characters, centering on a liberated thirtysomething career woman who isn't looking to be someone's wife. Her surrounding characters treat her with varying levels of respect based on their opinions about women in the workplace, but she wins them over with her aptitude for the job and her kindness. Over the course of its seven-year run, the show addressed serious issues like divorce, death, addiction, infidelity, and discrimination, all in a thoughtful (but ultimately humorous) manner.

Consumerism

Not applicable

Drugs / Tobacco / Alcohol

Mixed drinks and liquor are present in most social gatherings and in the workplace, where the boss keeps a stash in his desk drawer. Some characters show signs of overindulgence (hangovers, drunken slurred speech, etc.). The issue of addiction arises in an episode that shows Mary overcoming her dependence on sleeping pills.

  • Age appropriate
  • Not an issue
  • Depends on your child and your family
  • Parents strongly cautioned
  • Not appropriate for kids of the age

This information for parents is provided by Common Sense Media, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving kids' media lives.

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